We live in interesting times

An ancient Chinese curse is reported to be, “May you live in interesting times”. Well, there can be no doubt that we live in interesting times! There is division in our country unlike anything since, at least, the miners’ strikes in the 1980s. We see turmoil overseas as well, in Yemen, Congo, Libya and Iraq. The recent Turkish invasion has turned attention back to Syria and the civilian suffering there. (An ironic positive consequence is the long overdue US recognition of the Armenian genocide by the Turks a century ago, which was the model for Hitler for the Jewish holocaust. But I digress.) These nations are being ripped apart by disunity, with a loss of respect for government, and a loss of responsibility by government. Such political turmoil is described in the Bible as “The sun shall be turned to darkness and the moon to blood, before the coming of the great and glorious day of the Lord” (Acts 2:20). It is an image of shadow, darkness and conflict. Our country is not as disunited as those in civil war, but nonetheless we face great political and civil challenges. How should we, in our country and in our villages, respond to the coming days?

The answer, I believe, is as people of goodwill should always respond. In times of disagreement it is necessary to see the best of your opponent, and not the worst. It is a time, in particular, for kindliness and respect. It is a time to moderate speech and action, whilst holding fast to the principles in which we believe. We need to recognise that the loss of social cohesion is worse than any election result or any Brexit outcome. As a Christian, I see the attitude we need in the face of Christ, who “took the nature of a servant…and humbled himself” (Philippians 2:7-8). Jesus humbled himself so much that he came down from heaven to be our saviour (the Christmas story). And whether we believe this or not, the example is surely challenging. We need our politicians to serve us, not use us. And we need to serve others in our community, not just be self-seeking. In this way we begin to rebuild trust and that ultimate communal objective, love.

And so, may we, in our village communities, continue to do all we can to build up the values of service and love in our midst.

John Chitham, Rector